Tuesday, June 28, 2016

Lance Bass Feels That Coming Out Ruined His Chance For a Solo Career

by Music-News.com Newsdesk

Lance Bass has suggested his music isn't played in America because he's gay.

The former NSYNC singer, who came out in 2006, had a hit back in 2014 alongside Snoop Dogg with their track Walking on Air; however, the song failed to impress Stateside, and Lance has an idea of one reason for its lack of popularity in his home country.

"It went No. 1 everywhere... except America," Lance told the New York Post's gossip column Page Six. "The radio stations wouldn’t play my songs... I don’t know if it’s because I’m gay or if it’s because I’m from NSYNC, but the politics around it is so crazy and I don’t care to deal with that s**t.”

Lance first shot to fame as one fifth of boy band NSYNC, which also launched the music career of Justin Timberlake, but the group went on hiatus back in 2002.

Since then Lance has had some success as a solo singer, but has also ventured into other mediums such as radio and television. His next role will see him compete against his mother Diane in celebrity cooking competition My Kitchen Rules, and Lance knows that the small screen is where his future lies.

"I’m not 18 anymore, so I do (music) for fun," he added. "I go where I’m needed and wanted - and right now, that’s television."

Lance has also made a name for himself as an advocate for gay rights, and recently revealed that the recent mass shootings in Orlando, Florida, isn't going to put him off attending Pride events.

As well as hosting a Pride party at the Spotted Pig in the West Village in New York earlier this month, Lance is planning to show his face at as many similar events as possible, to show people he isn't scared in the wake of the tragic incident, which claimed the lives of 49 people at Pulse nightclub.

"People are living in fear right now, and I think it’s very important to show my face at as many Prides as I can," he told Page Six. "I was in Denver. I was in LA. I’m going to be going down to Orlando... I think it’s very important to show that we’re not scared.”